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By Robert J. Korpella

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Science and Technology

Mosquito Control

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They can detract from an otherwise perfect time in the Ozarks outdoors. Plus, diseases like West Nile and malaria are spread by mosquitoes. We spray ourselves up to ward them off and towns fog the air we breath in an…[read further]

By Robert J. Korpella

Destinations

Travelin’ the Ozarks: Events Taking Place During August

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Tontitown has been celebrating its rich heritage for 112 years. This year’s Grape Festival takes place Aug. 3-7 on the festival grounds of St. Joseph Catholic Church. There will be free concerts by nationally-recognized performers each night. The fun also…[read further]

By Jill M. Rohrbach, Ark. Dept. of Parks and Tourism

Backyard

Throwing Some Light on Twilight Gardening

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Twilight gardening is a way to extend enjoyment of outdoor plants past normal hours, said a University of Missouri Extension horticulturist.

“Twilight gardens are designed to be at their best at dusk, when natural light is fading,” said…[read further]

By MUNews

Environment

Research Links Pool Disinfectants to Health Problems

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Splashing around in a swimming pool on a hot summer day may not be as safe as you think. A recent University of Illinois study links the application of disinfectants in recreational pools to previously published adverse health outcomes such…[read further]

University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences

Outdoor Recreation

Glamping: A Posh Means of Enjoying the Outdoors

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In the Ozarks, our idea of camping is usually something like pitching a tent beside a lake or a stream, maybe a few hundred feet off a main trail, unrolling the sleeping bag, gathering up firewood and cooking over the…[read further]

By Robert J. Korpella

Environment

Wind Turbines Can Disrupt Radar

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Studies have shown that wind turbines can be fatal to bats that fly near them. It isn’t contact with the whirling blades that proves harmful to bats, it’s the air pressure change created by the blades that causes damage to…[read further]

By Robert J. Korpella

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Ponderings

An average porcupine has around 30,000 quills.

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